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# PALESTINE /// Cartographic Representation of the Bombings’ “Atmospheric” Impact in Gaza

# PALESTINE /// Cartographic Representation of the Bombings’ “Atmospheric” Impact in Gaza

Originally posted on The Funambulist:

Maps of Gaza by the UN Office for Coordination of Human Affairs (August 2014) – Selected and Augmented with 200-meter radius circles for The Funambulist (August 15, 2014)
Download a high-resolution version of the map here (9MB)
(license: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-ShareAlike 4.0)

When it comes to the Israeli enforced organization of space in…

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heaveninawildflower:

Sweet Lavender. Illustration by Katharine Cameron from  ’The Flowers I Love.’
Published 1917 by Frederick A. Stokes co. in New York .                    
archive.org

heaveninawildflower:

Sweet Lavender. Illustration by Katharine Cameron from  ’The Flowers I Love.’

Published 1917 by Frederick A. Stokes co. in New York .                    

archive.org

japaneseaesthetics:

Inro with fish and sea creature design by Kakosai, Japan 19th century.  Laquered wood, shell, horn, coloured ivory.  Inro (‘seal-basket’) are small decorative containers that hang from the waist. They originated at the end of the sixteenth century and were worn by men to hold seals and herbal and other medicines. They were considered a particularly good way of keeping the contents sealed and fresh. By the eighteenth century they had become decorative accessories and were commissioned by the merchant class, provincial rulers and their samurai, and those that could afford them.  text and image via VAM

japaneseaesthetics:

Inro with fish and sea creature design by Kakosai, Japan 19th century.  Laquered wood, shell, horn, coloured ivory.  Inro (‘seal-basket’) are small decorative containers that hang from the waist. They originated at the end of the sixteenth century and were worn by men to hold seals and herbal and other medicines. They were considered a particularly good way of keeping the contents sealed and fresh. By the eighteenth century they had become decorative accessories and were commissioned by the merchant class, provincial rulers and their samurai, and those that could afford them.  text and image via VAM

japaneseaesthetics:

Netsuke. Snail on tub. Made of wood..  19th century, Japan, by artist Shigemasa

japaneseaesthetics:

Netsuke. Snail on tub. Made of wood..  19th century, Japan, by artist Shigemasa

libutron:

Kota-tinggi Forest Gecko - Cyrtodactylus sworderi
The Kota-tinggi Forest Gecko, Cyrtodactylus sworderi (Gekkonidae), is an Asian bent-toed gecko restricted to Peninsular Malaysia. This species was redescribed in 2007 because the original description (1925) was done based only on an adult female with a regenerated tail.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©M.A. Muin Md. Akil | Locality: Malysia (2014)

libutron:

Kota-tinggi Forest Gecko - Cyrtodactylus sworderi

The Kota-tinggi Forest Gecko, Cyrtodactylus sworderi (Gekkonidae), is an Asian bent-toed gecko restricted to Peninsular Malaysia. This species was redescribed in 2007 because the original description (1925) was done based only on an adult female with a regenerated tail.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©M.A. Muin Md. Akil | Locality: Malysia (2014)

(via rhamphotheca)

aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

aleyma:

Dragonfly helmet, made in Japan in the 17th century (source).

High-ranking lords began to embellish their helmets with sculptural forms so that they could be visually located on the battlefield. Exotic helmets (kawari kabuto) also allowed leaders to choose symbolic motifs for their helmets that reflected some aspect of their personality or that of their collective battalions. This helmet is shaped like a giant dragonfly. In Japan, the dragonfly is symbolic of focused endeavor and vigilance because of its manner of moving up, down and sideways while continuing to face forward. In addition, in ancient texts Japan was often referred to as Akitsushima (Land of the Dragonflies), because of their abundance. They were also thought to be the spirits of rice, since they are often to be found hovering above the flooded rice fields. - from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts description

(via dendroica)

libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch
Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.
This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.
Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.
The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).
It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.
Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.
References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]
Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach
Locality: New South Wales, Australia

libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch

Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.

This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.

Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.

The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).

It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.

Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach

Locality: New South Wales, Australia

(via dendroica)